IPC A 610E PDF

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IPC-AE. This redline document is to help users see significant changes from Revision D. New or changed text are shown in blue and underlined like this. IPC-AE Acceptability of Electronic. Assemblies. Developed by the IPC- A development team including Task Group. (b), Task Group Asia. Contractual reference to IPC-A does not additionally impose the content of IPC-AJ- .. 7. Ground. Figure Parallel Connected Wrist Strap E Fig 1.


Ipc A 610e Pdf

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IPC-AG is the latest revision of the most widely used electronics assembly standard in the world. IPC AG is now available from phisrebiberkotch.ml In May the IPC's Technical Activities Executive Committee (TAEC) adopted Principles of. Standardization as a guiding principle of IPC's standardization. E to F Redline Comparison. Purpose. The visual standards in this document reflect the requirements of existing IPC and other applicable specifications.

This voluntary standard establishes minimum requirements for the design, installation, operation and maintenance of electrically heated process equipment in order to minimize electrical hazards and prevent fires that may occur in combustible tanks, tank liners and drying equipment. May This standard establishes the generic and specific guidelines for the design of metallic conductors in organic printed boards and other material that may be homogeneous, reinforced, or used in combination with inorganic materials.

This standard establishes the generic requirements for the design of organic printed boards and other forms of component mounting or interconnecting structures.

The organic materials may be homogeneous, reinforced, or used in combination with inorganic materials; the interconnections The intent of this standard is to establish the governing semantics and an XML based syntax for shop floor communication between electronic assembly equipment and associated software applications. Wherever possible, existing and widely accepted protocols have been utilized. Certain guaranteed behaviors have been This standard specifies a data file format used to describe printed board and printed board assembly products with details sufficient for tooling, manufacturing, assembly, inspection and testing requirements.

These formats may be used for transmitting information between a printed board designer and a January This standard specifies the XML schema that represents the data file format used to describe printed board and printed board assembly products with details sufficient for tooling, manufacturing, assembly, inspection and testing requirements.

This format may be used for transmitting information between a November This standard is part of the IPC series of standards. These standards are used to specify a data file format used to describe printed board and printed board assembly products with details sufficient for tooling, manufacturing, assembly, inspection and testing requirements.

These formats may be used for This standard specifies data formats used to describe drawing methodologies for printed boards and printed board assemblies. These formats may be used for transmitting information between a printed board designer and a printed board manufacturer. This standard specifies data formats used to describe printed board assembly in-circuit testing methodologies.

These formats may be used for transmitting information between printed circuit board designers and printed board manufacturers. The formats are also useful when the manufacturing cycle includes This standard specifies data formats used to describe printed circuit board assembly product manufacturing methodologies. These formats may be used for transmitting information between a printed circuit board designers, board fabricators, and assembly manufacturers.

The formats are also useful when the These formats may be used for transmitting information between printed board designers, board fabricators, and assembly manufacturers. The formats are also useful when the manufacturing cycle This standard specifies data formats used to describe parts lists and bill of material generation methodologies.

February This document describes a PWB fabrication data quality rating system used by fabricators to evaluate the incoming data package integrity. When invoked by the customer or per contractual agreement. When documents other than IPC-A are cited. Missing hardware or components are a Defect for all classes. The customer user has the ultimate responsibility for identifying the class to which the assembly is evaluated.

Class 2 -. Unless otherwise specified herein. If the assembly does not comply with these or with equivalent requirements. Objective evidence of that proficiency shall be maintained and available for review. Objective evidence should include records of training to the applicable job functions being performed.

Class 1 -. A brief description follows each illustration. In the event of conflict. Where a requirement is presented that cannot be defined by the acceptable. Dedicated Service Electronic Products Includes products where continued performance and extended life is required. It is not the intent of this document to exclude any acceptable procedure for component placement or for applying flux and solder used to make the electrical connection.

General Electronic Products Includes products suitable for applications where the major requirement is function of the completed assembly. If the user and manufacturer do not establish and document the acceptance class.

Typically the end-use environment would not cause failures. Criteria defined in this document reflect three classes. Procurement as agreed and documented between customer and supplier. In order for the user to apply and use the content of this document.

Conditions of acceptability provided in this specification are individually defined and created with separate consideration for their impact upon reliable operation for the defined production classification. Repair or "use as is" may require customer concurrence. The User is responsible to identify combined conditions where there is significant concern based upon end use environment and product performance requirements.

It is the responsibility of the User to define unique defect categories applicable to the product. Acceptable Condition. Disposition may be to rework. The manufacturer is responsible for identification of such conditions.

A defect for Class 2 implies a defect for Class 3. Target Condition. The significant number of combinations that could occur does not allow full definition in the content and scope of this specification but manufacturers should be vigilant for the possibility of combined and cumulative conditions and their impact upon product performance. Where related conditions can be combined. A defect for Class 1 automatically implies a defect for Class 2 and 3.

Defect conditions shall be dispositioned by the manufacturer based on design. Magnification aids. This includes small balls of solder paste that have splattered around the connection during the reflow process. The referee magnification power is intended for use only after a defect has been determined but is not completely identifiable at the inspection power.

Referee conditions are used to verify product rejected at the inspection magnification power. For assemblies with mixed land widths. Unless magnification requirements are otherwise specified by contractual documentation.

If the presence of a defect cannot be determined at the inspection power. Note 1 Note 1: Visual inspection may require the use of magnification. Note 2: If magnification is used it is limited to 4X maximum. Staking Notes 1. Information in this section is intended to be general in nature. This section illustrates several types of hardware used to mount electronic devices to a printed circuit assembly PCA or any other types of assemblies requiring the use of any of the following: This section is primarily concerned with visual assessment of proper securing tightness , and also with damage to the devices, hardware, and the mounting surface that can result from hardware mounting.

Process documentation drawings, prints, parts list, and build process will specify what to use; deviations need to have prior customer approval. Visual inspection is performed in order to verify the following conditions: Correct parts and hardware. Correct sequence of assembly.

Correct security and tightness of parts and hardware. No discernible damage. Correct orientation of parts and hardware. Class 1. Class 1 Defect — Class 2. High Power Figures and show typical mounting parts. Component Mounting. Threaded Fasteners and Other Threaded Hardware —Torque In addition to threaded fasteners used for installation of an item onto an assembly. Such items include.

Where torque requirements are not specified. These may require tightening to a specified torque value. Hardware stack-up for mounted connectors may be varied in order to locate the face of the jackpost flush to 0.

This is critical to obtain maximum connector pin contact. If soldering is required the following criteria is applicable. Solder fillet or fill on primary insertion side is not required.

Press Fit Pins Target — Class 1. Class 2. This tie may eventually loosen. OD is the outer diameter of the wire or cable.

Coaxial Fixed Cable. Note 3: Coaxial Flexible Cable. Coaxial cable that is or may be flexed during operation of the equipment. Acceptable — Class 1. Coaxial cable that is secured to prevent movement. Class 1 Process Indicator. This includes Solder fines are typically small balls of the original solder paste metal screen size that have splattered around the connection during the reflow process.

The method used to determine if conductive particulate matter solder balls. Excess Solder. Figure E 5. Excess Solder Metal lidded components Solder splashes or tinning on a metalized package body. Target — Class 1. Solder splashes on the metalized surfaces may be acceptable if the extended electrical performance is not required or compromised. Figures and are examples of hot tear.

Side Route Attachments 6. Staked Wires 6. Bottom and Top Route 6. Position 6. Damage 6. Solder 6. Class 1 Defect. Circumferential fillet and wetting. Height of solder on flared flange.

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Defect — Class 1. Height of solder on flat set flange. These criteria are also applicable to post-assembly acceptance.

Additional criteria for insulation damage as a result of soldering operations are provided in 6. The cut ends of some insulation materials. Acceptability of this fraying should be agreed upon between the Manufacturer and User.

Damage Acceptable — Class 1. Defect — Class 2. Flexible Sleeve These criteria are intended for use with shrink sleeving. Flexible Sleeve. Criteria for other types of sleeving should be agreed upon between Manufacturer and User.

Heating processes used to shrink sleeve insulation shall not damage the connector. Maximum allowable strands Number of strands scraped. No damaged strands for wires used at a potential for 6 kV or greater or otherwise designated as high voltage.

For plated wires. Class 2 Defect. Damage — Solid Wire Acceptable. See 5.

See Table Stress Relief 6. Stress Relief. Acceptable — Class 1 Defect — Class Acceptable — Class 1 Defect — Class 2.

The criteria associated with each terminal type or connection in clauses 6. Unless otherwise specified the wire or lead should be in contact with base of the terminal or a previously installed wire. Class 1 Process Indicator — Class 2.

See 6. Turrets and Straight Pins 6. Defect Note 1: Note 1 Acceptable Defect Wire violates minimum electrical clearance. Turret Turrets and Straight Pin. Solder Target — Class 1.

AWG and smaller 2. Slotted 6. Wire end violates minimum electrical clearance. Note 1 Acceptable Defect Wire does not pass through the eye. Wire attached outside the arc of the hook and less than two lead diameters or 1 mm [0. Wire violates minimum electrical clearance. Solder Cups. Solder Cups 6. Solder These criteria are applicable to either solid or stranded wire. These criteria do not apply to jumper wires.

Edge Clip. Bonding material is sufficient to hold the part but does not encapsulate and cover component identification. Vias 7. Lead in Hole 7. Land Area Coverage C 7. Elevated Components 7. Land Area Coverage E 7. Vertical 7. Meniscus in Solder 7. Solder in Lead Bend 7. Visual inspection includes part identification and polarity. The placement of any component on the electronic assembly does not prevent the insertion or removal of any hardware tool clearance included used to mount the assembly.

Lead to Barrel D 7. Lead to Barrel B 7. In addition to the criteria in this section the criteria of Section 5 are applicable. Minimum spacing between installed hardware and the conducting land.

Orientation This section covers acceptability requirements for the installation. Criteria are given for only the actual mounting or placement of components or wires on electronic assemblies and to standoff terminalsspacers.

Inspection usually starts with a general overall view of the electronic assembly. Lead Forming 7. Solder is mentioned where it is an integral part of the placement dimensions. Horizontal Additional criteria for horizontal mounting of axial leaded components are provided in clauses 7. The component preparation equipment and manufacturer's suggested component lead bend specifications and capabilities determine limitation.

Rectangular leads use thickness T. Use of loop bends may impact circuit impedance. Lead Forming — Stress Relief Components are mounted in any 1 or a combination of the following configurations: Loop bends may be used if the location of the mounting holes prevents the use of a standard bend and if there is no possibility of shorting the lead to any adjacent component lead or conductor. Maximum space clearance between component and board surface is determined by design limitations and product use environments.

This may require change in tooling to meet requirements for end use. Configuration incorporating a single camel hump may have the body positioned off-center. Prepped components with stress bends as shown in Figure usually cannot meet the maximum spacing clearance requirements of a straight-legged vertical.

Lead Forming.

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Some components cannot be tilted due to mating requirements with enclosures or panels. Radial Leads — Vertical. The body may need to be bonded or otherwise secured to the board to prevent damage when vibration and shock forces are applied.

Class 1 Process Indicator Supported Holes. Class 3 Defect Unsupported Holes — Class 1. Class 2 Defect Supported Holes. Radial Leads. When documented on an approved assembly drawing. Class Adhesive Bonding -Non-Elevated Components These criteria are the same for sleeved or unsleeved components.

Figure Adhesive Bonding. High frequency applications may require more precise control of lead extensions to prevent violation of functional design considerations. End is discernible in the solder. Tempered leads shall not be terminated with a full clinched configuration. Connector leads. This section applies to terminations with a clinching requirement. As an exception to discernible minimum lead length see 7.

The orientation of the clinch relative to any conductor is optional. The clinch should be sufficient to provide mechanical restraint during the soldering process. Lead protrusion shall be in accordance with Table DIP leads should have at least two diagonally opposing leads partially bent outward.

The lead meets the protrusion requirements of Table when measured vertically from the land surface and does not violate minimum electrical clearance requirements. Other requirements may be specified on relevant specifications or drawings.

Leads greater than 1. Partially clinched leads for part retention are considered as unclenched leads and shall meet protrusion requirements.

IPC 610E RO_Standard

Note 3. Note 4: Limited to Class 2 to TH components with 15 leads or more. Note 1. For TH components with less than 14 leads Class 3 criteria applies. The user is responsible for identifying these situations to the manufacturer. Note 2. For intrusive soldering there may not be an external fillet between the lead and the land.

Wetted solder refers to solder applied by the solder process. Note 5Note 3: Not Specified. Class 1 Acceptable. Lead to Barrel B Target — Class 1. Solder Source Secondary Side. Lead to Barrel D Acceptable. Solder in Lead Bend Solder in the bend radius is not cause for rejection provided the lead is properly formed and the topside bend radius is discernible.

Secondary Solder Source Side. Solder Destination Primary Side. When required for certain applications. Acceptable Class 2.

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Solder capped PTHs have the possibility of entrapping contaminants that are difficult to remove if cleaning is required. There is no defect condition for this. Clinch required for Class 3. Lead protrusion should not exceed 2. No plating in barrel 2. Tempered leads are not terminated with a full-clinched configuration.

Partially clinched leads for part retention are considered as unclenched leads and need to meet protrusion requirements. The lead meets the requirements of Table when measured vertically from the land surface and does not violate minimum electrical clearance requirements. Tempered leads and leads greater than 1.

When routed over components consider the implications of wires coming in contact with heat sinks or hot components and electrical interference in RF applications. Take in consideration the trapping of contaminants when wires are routed under components. Jumper wires 30 AWG and smaller do not need to comply with clause 6.

Wrapped Attachment The jumper wire ends are attached to component lead projections by wrapping the wire. Supported Holes. The following criteria apply when soldering to a land or a component lead and land. When soldering to a land. Lap Soldered For jumper wires attached to components other than axial leaded.

When soldering to a component lead and land. Some dimensions. A thick G is desirable. Dimension G is the solder fillet from the top of the land to the bottom of the termination. Additional information related to reliability of surface mount connections is available in IPC-D Bottom Only Terminations 8. Dimension G is the prime parameter in the determination of solder connection reliability for leadless components. Target — Class The circumference bonding may have 1 or more adhesive points.

Exceptions are when a copper lead or termination configuration causes the solder fillet to contact a plastic component body. Unless otherwise specified. Slight flow under the component body is acceptable provided it does not damage the components or assembly in its intended service environment. Flattening Components with axial leads of round cross-section may be flattened coined for positive seating in surface mounting. Solder acceptance criteria should be defined between the Manufacturer and User.

Solder fillet may extend through the top bend. Solder fillet wetting to the sides or ends of the leads is not required unless specifically stated. Damage These criteria are applicable whether leads are formed manually or by machine or die.

Designs with via in land may preclude meeting fillet height criteria. Solder should not extend under the body of surface mount components whose leads are made of Alloy 42 or similar metals. Such restrictions should be identified in drawings. Connections formed to chip components with bottom only terminations shall meet dimensional and solder fillet requirements in Table and 8.

The widths of the component termination and land width are W and P. Wetting is evident. The length of the component termination is R and the length of the land is S.

Table Dimensional Criteria. Unspecified parameter or variable in size. Criteria for tall profile components with bottom only terminations are in 8. Does not violate minimum electrical clearance. Bottom Only Terminations Discrete chip components. Rectangular or Square End Chip Components.

Note 8 Terminations Component has 3 or more wettable termination areas on each end. Unspecified dimension. Bottom Only Terminations. Solder connections to components having terminations of a square or rectangular configuration shall meet the dimensional and solder fillet requirements in Table and 8.

Note 6. End Overlap J Acceptable. For 1 sided termination.

Notes 7. The maximum fillet may overhang the land preclude meeting these criteria. Note 6: Designs with open. Note 5: C is measured from the narrowest side of the Note 8: Component size may be larger than if the solder fillet. The maximum fillet may overhang Note Class 3 Acceptable. These criteria may not be acceptable for certain body.

Side Joint Length D Target. Minimum Fillet Height F Acceptable. Termination Variations 8. Termination Variations. Mounting on Side Billboarding This section provides criteria for chip components that may flip rotate onto the narrow edge during assembly.

These criteria may not be acceptable for certain high frequency or high vibration applications. Termination Variations — 3Center Terminations These criteria are also applicable to cylindrical chip components with side terminations. When stacking components.Class 1 Defect.

IPC A-610 PDF Download – Acceptability of Electronic Assemblies

Burr 2. Popular in Standards. When soldering these types of components voiding in the thermal plane is common. Land 3. Discrete Wiring Acceptability Guidelines The routing and terminating of discrete wires to form point-to-point electrical connections by use of special machines or tools may be employed to replace or supplement printed conductors on board assemblies. Elevated Components 7.

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